The World We Live In

So basically, Ronald Reagan set up hospital emergency rooms as socialized healthcare, and then…

…didn’t fund them.

It’s an unfunded mandate.

So it’s illegal to let patients die on your doorstep. A step forward in society (Reagan at the time said it allied with American’s Christian principles and his own). But the Republicans of the time never paid for it. They kicked that particular can down the road.

As a result, hospitals saw emergency room visits drastically increase. Insurance companies, because many of the uninsured used emergency rooms as care (to which they’re legally allowed, it’s how to collect the payment later that’s in issue), try to refuse to pay for the increase. Hospitals got clever at burying costs into healthy patient’s procedures, or anywhere else.

The system gets distorted.

So we already have socialized healthcare, it’s just that the hospitals, the government, and the insurance companies are all putting their fingers on their noses and saying ‘not it!’ due to that single fact: the 1986 bill was an unfunded mandate.

World Health Organization: Polio on the rise in war-torn Syria

shortformblog:

  • 22 the number of people—mostly young children—that have contracted polio in Syria, according to the World Health Organization. It’d be the first outbreak in the country in 14 years, and as many as 100,000 children are susceptible to the disease in the highly-contested Deir Ezzor province alone. Due to the poor living conditions, refugees are also susceptible to the disease as well. source

odins-one-eyed-fuck:

gettingcrazywiththecheezewhiz:

The dad cat liked to hang out in the sink by himself

AND THEN THE KITTENS FOUND HIM

HE LOOKS SO ANNOYED

I DIDN’T SIGN ON FOR THIS SHIT.

it literally can not get cuter than this

"We don’t regret the revolution, but we want it to end’

syrianfreedomls:

October 24, 2013

Ghira’a, 28, lives with her 11-year-old son and elderly father in a small tent in Bab al-Salameh camp, where they fled last year after shelling destroyed their home in a village outside Idlib city. Roughly 3,700 of Syria’s 5.1 million Internally Displaced Persons live in the camp, close to the village of Atmaa next to Syria’s northern border with Turkey.

 A day after heavy rain flooded the tents, Ghira’a’s family and neighbors huddle around their television, a luxury in the camp. Syria Direct’s Nuha Shabaan visited Ghira’a and spoke with her about fears of the upcoming winter and why she believes women are being sidelined in the Syrian revolution.

Q: Do you regret the revolution?

A: No. We don’t regret the revolution, but we want it to end. We are very tired. I want the world to see what has happened to us. What did we do to deserve something like this?

Q: You spent last winter here. What do you expect to be different in your second winter?

A: Not much. Last winter was very hard. Many children died because of the cold. I don’t know what will happen to us. I was expecting to have already returned to our village, but things are getting more complicated. We are slowly dying.

image

Torn tents in Bab al-Salameh camp, home to 3,700 of Syria’s 5.1 million IDPs. Photo courtesy of Nuha Shabaan.

I think it’s going to be a long winter. If it starts raining we will drown in the mud and our children will die of the cold. We hope someone will come and have mercy on us.

Q: How are you preparing for winter?

A: It’s very cold here in the winter, and the blankets they distributed are very thin and don’t warm you. The night is long. We want warm blankets for winter.

Q: What is your opinion about the role of women in the Syrian revolution?

A: I see it as very weak. You only hear powerful men’s voices. Where are the women of Syria? Where is their role? It comes from awareness, but her voice is very weak. We have cultured women, women of literature, women who are authors, everything. But [a woman’s] voice is strangled, weak. That is how I see it.

Q: Do you see Syrian women opposition on TV? Do you you think they represent Syrian women?

A: Of course they represent us, but very weakly. I am not educated, unfortunately. I only studied until sixth grade, but my sister is a university student and my sister is a voluntary student in a religious school.

Q: As women in the camp, what is your role? What are your activities?

A: For me and most other women, most of what we do is the cooking, cleaning, washing and educating our children. Other women teach children in a school in the camp.

Q: How do you get water here?

A: Wells have been opened in the camp. Youth dug and made wells especially for drinking water. We have a water pump that runs on gas. It used to be very hard to provide water. Our life was hell. Cars would come and distribute water, but not enough. It always ran out immediately. We couldn’t do much with it, no washing or cleaning.

Thank God, it’s much better now.

Q: Who gives you aid?

A: There are people who come and donate, but very few. The camp is full of widows and divorced women who need help.

breakingnews:

Saudi women drive cars to protest government ban
The Associated Press: Women in Saudi Arabia took to the streets in cars on Saturday to protest the ban on female driving in the ultraconservative kingdom.Activists said more than 60 women claimed to have participated in the protest action, which was deemed a rare show of defiance.See submitted videos from female drivers at Breaking News. Photo: Saudi activist Manal al-Sharif, who helped spark the 2011 driving protest, behind the wheel in Dubai. (Marwan Naamani/AFP/Getty Images)

breakingnews:

Saudi women drive cars to protest government ban

The Associated Press: Women in Saudi Arabia took to the streets in cars on Saturday to protest the ban on female driving in the ultraconservative kingdom.

Activists said more than 60 women claimed to have participated in the protest action, which was deemed a rare show of defiance.

See submitted videos from female drivers at Breaking News.

Photo: Saudi activist Manal al-Sharif, who helped spark the 2011 driving protest, behind the wheel in Dubai. (Marwan Naamani/AFP/Getty Images)

nietzschesghost:

iamreallyspoopy:

I’m not saying lesbians are more or less accepted or whatever. Hell, how would I even find information on that?

But wow anyone who has ever been on a porn site can probably tell you that there’s nothing people haven’t sexualized. And sure, the big bad straight white male might fetishize lesbians, but uh, wow do women ever fetishize gay males right back.

People have sexualised pandas ffs.

The animal that won’t even fuck to save it’s species has been sexualised

Going way back in my fandom history

So I used to be really into Inuyasha, but then again what prepubescent girl wasn’t?, so as a joke one day I suggested my boyfriend name his Gliscor “Shiori”. Well he just got the new Pokemon game and he wanted to know what he should name his Swoobat, suggesting it be another bat-demon, so I looked up the episode and we agreed on “Tsukuyomaru” (Tsuku for short).

So i got caught up in the nostalgia and started clicking around Inuyasha fan-sites and OMG INUYASHA IS NOT 17 WTF CAN YOU NOT DO MATH!? He was born the day his father died 200 YEARS AGO.  Just because he looks young and is technically a young adult doesn’t make him 17. They are really gonna make me have to go back to my Inuyasha days with this. Not cool dudes.

How Well Do Your Followers Know You?

debunk-the-feminist:

ericandy:

Fill this out in my ask box! One point for every correct answer. Ten points total plus bonus points for multiple correct answers. I’ll reply with your total score!

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ooooo do this please!

descentintotyranny:

Fukushima whistleblower exposes yakuza connections, exploitation of cleanup workers
Oct. 25 2013
Revelations from a Fukushima cleanup worker-turned-whistleblower have exposed the plant’s chaotic system of subcontractors, their alleged mafia connections and the super-exploitation of indigent workers doing this dangerous work.
The allegations, contained in an investigative report by Reuters, have also exposed deeply-rooted problems within Japan’s nuclear industry as a whole. In the report, detailing the everyday realities of workers at the stricken facility, Reuters interviewed an estimated 80 casual workers and managers. The most common complaint voiced was the cleanup effort’s utter dependence on subcontractors – which it is alleged endangered not just workers’ rights, but also their lives.
Tetsuya Hayashi, a 41-tyear-old construction worker by trade, applied for a job at the stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, after he suspected that the plant was in deeper trouble than it was willing to admit. The $150 billion cleanup effort, which is expected to last several decades into the future, has already required up to 50,000, mostly casual workers.
However, Hayashi only lasted two weeks on the job, as it became apparent that the vast network of subcontractors involved in the cleanup efforts could not care less for his rights (or his health), while Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO), the plant’s operator, was doing little except giving subcontractors a slap on the wrist.
Hired to monitor the exposure to radiation of plant workers leaving the job during the summer of 2012, Hayashi was assigned to the most bio-hazardous sector and given a protective anti-radiation suit. However, even with the suit on, we exceeded his safe annual radiation quota in less than an hour. 
The subcontractor who hired Hayashi was not following nuclear safety rules, according to exposure guidelines by the International Atomic Energy Agency, Reuters reported.
Furthermore, after Hayashi’s first two-week period of employment, he suspected that his passbook, a document showing the extent of a worker’s exposure to radiation, had been falsified by his employer, RH Kogyo, to reflect that he had been hired by a company higher up on the contractor food chain. The passbook shows that Suzushi Kogyo employed him from May to June 2012, while another firm, Take One, employed him for a brief 10 days in June. The truth was that RH Kogyo had given him a one-year contract.
"My suspicion is that they falsified the records to hide the fact that they had outsourced my employment," Reuters reported Hayashi as saying.
The above was the start of his troubles.
Read More

descentintotyranny:

Fukushima whistleblower exposes yakuza connections, exploitation of cleanup workers

Oct. 25 2013

Revelations from a Fukushima cleanup worker-turned-whistleblower have exposed the plant’s chaotic system of subcontractors, their alleged mafia connections and the super-exploitation of indigent workers doing this dangerous work.

The allegations, contained in an investigative report by Reuters, have also exposed deeply-rooted problems within Japan’s nuclear industry as a whole. In the report, detailing the everyday realities of workers at the stricken facility, Reuters interviewed an estimated 80 casual workers and managers. The most common complaint voiced was the cleanup effort’s utter dependence on subcontractors – which it is alleged endangered not just workers’ rights, but also their lives.

Tetsuya Hayashi, a 41-tyear-old construction worker by trade, applied for a job at the stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, after he suspected that the plant was in deeper trouble than it was willing to admit. The $150 billion cleanup effort, which is expected to last several decades into the future, has already required up to 50,000, mostly casual workers.

However, Hayashi only lasted two weeks on the job, as it became apparent that the vast network of subcontractors involved in the cleanup efforts could not care less for his rights (or his health), while Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO), the plant’s operator, was doing little except giving subcontractors a slap on the wrist.

Hired to monitor the exposure to radiation of plant workers leaving the job during the summer of 2012, Hayashi was assigned to the most bio-hazardous sector and given a protective anti-radiation suit. However, even with the suit on, we exceeded his safe annual radiation quota in less than an hour.

The subcontractor who hired Hayashi was not following nuclear safety rules, according to exposure guidelines by the International Atomic Energy Agency, Reuters reported.

Furthermore, after Hayashi’s first two-week period of employment, he suspected that his passbook, a document showing the extent of a worker’s exposure to radiation, had been falsified by his employer, RH Kogyo, to reflect that he had been hired by a company higher up on the contractor food chain. The passbook shows that Suzushi Kogyo employed him from May to June 2012, while another firm, Take One, employed him for a brief 10 days in June. The truth was that RH Kogyo had given him a one-year contract.

"My suspicion is that they falsified the records to hide the fact that they had outsourced my employment," Reuters reported Hayashi as saying.

The above was the start of his troubles.

Read More