The World We Live In
Just watched For Colored Girls for the first time

I caught it just as it came on TV and I was so excited; I’ve been wanting to see it since it came out. I expected it to be an experience but not the one it was. This is a movie you all need to see, every single woman out there.

comicbooksandtiaras:

My girl loves her Superheroes. We read comic books together on special lunch dates, just the two of us. The first comic book we ever read together was Supergirl from the New 52. Before that we’ve been reading Superhero children’s books, though most of them are geared towards young boys, and the only superhero featured is Wonder Woman, mostly as a background character to Superman and Batman. She loves Batman and at Halloween time was thrilled to find a Batgirl costume, though she was confused because she had never seen Batgirl in her books. So now we read Batgirl comic books as well. We are loving Gail Simone’s Batgirl during our special comic book lunch dates.
Unfortunately the girls section at clothing stores don’t have any superhero items. I’ve had to pick up all of her superhero clothes in the boys section. Some kids in her class have begun to tease her for wearing boy clothes. She’s been sticking up for herself saying they’re “Kid’s sizes” not just for boys, & girls like superheroes! One boy stopped teasing and thinks it’s cool she wears them, but there are a few girls that still point it out every time she wears one (which is almost every day!) It hurts me every time she tells me about it, but she doesn’t seem upset over it. She’s confused as to why they don’t understand that girls like superheroes. I just hope it doesn’t get to her, and cause her to no longer like the things she likes. I’m trying to teach her that it doesn’t matter what other people think, that you can like whatever you like, but I know what it’s like to be teased by your peers & wanting to cave to that peer pressure. She’s a strong kid & I hope she stays that way.

This girl is my new hero.

comicbooksandtiaras:

My girl loves her Superheroes. We read comic books together on special lunch dates, just the two of us. The first comic book we ever read together was Supergirl from the New 52. Before that we’ve been reading Superhero children’s books, though most of them are geared towards young boys, and the only superhero featured is Wonder Woman, mostly as a background character to Superman and Batman. She loves Batman and at Halloween time was thrilled to find a Batgirl costume, though she was confused because she had never seen Batgirl in her books. So now we read Batgirl comic books as well. We are loving Gail Simone’s Batgirl during our special comic book lunch dates.

Unfortunately the girls section at clothing stores don’t have any superhero items. I’ve had to pick up all of her superhero clothes in the boys section. Some kids in her class have begun to tease her for wearing boy clothes. She’s been sticking up for herself saying they’re “Kid’s sizes” not just for boys, & girls like superheroes! One boy stopped teasing and thinks it’s cool she wears them, but there are a few girls that still point it out every time she wears one (which is almost every day!) It hurts me every time she tells me about it, but she doesn’t seem upset over it. She’s confused as to why they don’t understand that girls like superheroes. I just hope it doesn’t get to her, and cause her to no longer like the things she likes. I’m trying to teach her that it doesn’t matter what other people think, that you can like whatever you like, but I know what it’s like to be teased by your peers & wanting to cave to that peer pressure. She’s a strong kid & I hope she stays that way.

This girl is my new hero.

My sister dyed her hair again. Nothing I say can convince her that she was prettiest when it was natural. She’s dyed it at least 5 times a year since she was 10 because, as she puts it, “I’m ugly I need to dye my hair to look better.”

She’d be so beautiful if she just left herself alone for 5 minutes.

Dozens of Afghan schoolgirls hospitalized for third time in 2 weeks; Taliban blamed for ‘poison attack’

Police in northern Afghanistan say 160 schoolgirls were admitted to a local hospital after they were thought to be poisoned by the Taliban. It’s the third such poisoning of Afghan schoolgirls in less than two weeks.

The girls “complained of headaches, dizziness and vomiting before being taken to the hospital,” Hafizullah Safi, director of the Takhar health department, told CNN. Most were discharged within a few hours, Safi said.

Officials suspect their classrooms were sprayed with a toxic chemical by militants who oppose education for girls.

Last week, more than 120 girls and three teachers were hospitalized under similar circumstances. The Taliban denied responsibility for the May 23 attack. The day before, 40 girls were hospitalized at a different school.

Historically, the Taliban has been opposed to girls attending school, and had previously called for schools to be closed in northern Afghanistan. Conservative government officials have also opposed girls going to school.

According to the BBC, some officials have attributed the attacks “to mass hysteria among schoolgirls,” noting that few if any “have displayed long-term symptoms of poisoning.” Others, though, say the sheer number of students displaying symptoms cannot be entirely attributed to hysteria.

And it’s not the first time Afghan schoolgirls have been targeted. In 2009, hundreds of girls were hospitalized in the Kapisa province in eastern Afghanistan in three attacks over as many weeks. In 2010, more than three dozen schoolgirls were hospitalized in a suspected poison attack at another girls school.

Tuesday’s apparent attack comes a week after President Barack Obama signed off on a plan for U.S. troop withdrawal from Afghanistan by the end of 2014.